Now More Than Ever: Stand Up for Social Justice

Now more than ever, we must prioritize social justice education for our students.  At this divisive time, our students and teachers are working together to build more dialogue and understanding between and within our communities. But we need your help to keep up our important work. Hands for a Bridge relies on the support of…

HFB Annual Auction November 19th

Please join us for an evening of libations, hors d’oeuvres, and entertainment. 6-9pm on Saturday November 19, 2016, Bloedel Hall at St. Mark’s Cathedral This not your standard sit-down auction, but a fun social event with opportunities to mingle, bid on hundreds of silent auction items, and enter exciting raffles. Lots of easy free parking.…

Thank You for Giving BIG!

Thank you to our community of supporters who helped us have our biggest GiveBIG result ever!  On May 3rd and 4th, the Seattle Foundation, along with generous community partners, stretched each and every gift made to area nonprofits- including HFB. Your generous donations make our work possible. We look forward to keeping you posted on…

Make an Impact: GiveBIG 2016

  GiveBIG 2016 is your chance to make an impact on our community’s youth development and social justice work. On Tuesday, May 3, the Seattle Foundation is stretching every gift made to area nonprofits through givebig.seattlefoundation.org, so your donation will go further. You can schedule a donation directly by visiting our page,  https://givebig.seattlefoundation.org/npo/hands-for-a-bridge as early as Monday,…

Thank You Lummi Youth Academy!

Hands for a Bridge was honored to host a day of education, laughter and learning on October 22 by hosting the play Sonny Sixkiller Buys the Washington Redskins. This exciting live production by Native American playwright, Darrell Hillaire, was shown last year to an enthusiastic audience at the Moore Theatre and joined us again to Seattle…

Uncovering the Memory of Race

I was raised to be colorblind. One person is the same as another, but being equal in one place is different than in another. Distinct views separate cultures, not one alike. Some are looked down upon as people of lower class and value, lesser humans. In the South, my mom grew up with these views…